Olu Jacobs Was Once Called A Dog By A White Woman For This Reason



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Jacobs also explained that he chose Britain because he felt it was the right place to fulfil his ambition.

“At that time, if you desired to do this job that we are doing in the arts, you had to go to either Europe or America. France was out of the question for me because I didn’t speak French. I still don’t speak French neither do I speak German or Russian. English was the language of communication that I knew and whatever I wanted to learn I preferred to do it in the language that I understood. And since we already had a relationship between Britain and Nigeria, it was much easier for me to go to England,” he said.

At a time most immigrants of African origin were having difficulty building a career or getting decent jobs, Jacobs was able to make it to the British arts scene with relative ease. Looking back at those days, he attributed it to good fortune. “Providence must have had a hand in it. I think good luck was following me everywhere I went. Back then, to become an actor in England, you must be able to have an equity card. The card was issued by the actors’ union in that country. To get the card, you must have a job. And to get a job, you must have an agent, ” he said.

I was a victim of racism all the time. You felt it in the way the people looked at you and in their attitude toward you. But you could not do anything about it. I could not take somebody to court for that,”the actor said.

Recalling an incident that occurred in the first year of his stay in London, he added,

“A white woman once called me a dog. She had a vacant room for rent. But when I approached her, she asked if I didn’t see the ‘No dogs’ sign on her door. Before I could respond, she said that a dog was better than me and then slammed the door in my face. I felt so bad that I almost decided to return to Nigeria.”

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